Michael Eriksson's Blog

A Swede in Germany

Posts Tagged ‘electrolysis

Follow-up: On Firefox and its decline

leave a comment »

Since my post on the decline of Firefox, the developers have released another “great” feature, supposed to solve the speed problem compared to Chrome and other competitors: Electrolysis* (aka. e10s).

*I have no idea how they came up with this misleading name. Possibly, they picked a word at random in a dictionary?

This feature adds considerable multi-threading capability and detaches the GUI from the back-end of the browser, thereby on paper making the browser faster and/or hiding the lags that do occur from the user.

In reality? In one browser installation* (shortly after the feature being activated) I had to disable this feature, because it caused random and unpredictable tab failures several times a day, forcing me to “restart” (I believe the chosen word was) the tab in order to view it again. Even the tabs that did not need to be restarted only displayed again with a lag every time another tab had failed. The net effect was not only to make the browser more error prone, but also to make it slower (on average).

*I have several Firefox (more specifically Tor Browser) installations for different user accounts and with different user settings, including e.g. separate installations for business purposes, private surfing, and my WordPress account. This to reduce both the risk of a security breach and the effects of a breach, should one still occur. As for why the other installations were not affected, this is likely due to the roll-out manner used by Firefox of just activating a feature in existing installations, based on an installation dependent schedule, instead of waiting for the next upgrade. Presumably, all the other installations had received upgrades before being hit by the roll-out. (This approach is both ethically dubious and a poor software practice, because it removes control from the users, even to the point of risking his ability to continue working. What if something goes so wrong that a down-grade or re-install is needed—with no working browser installed? This is very bad for the private user; in a business setting, it could spell disaster.)

Today, I had to deactivate it in another installation: After opening and closing a greater number of tabs, Firefox grew more and more sluggish, often only displaying a page several seconds after I had entered the tab, or showing half a page and then waiting for possibly 5–10 seconds before displaying the rest. This for the third time in possibly a week after my latest upgrade. (I would speculate on some type of memory leak or other problem with poor resource clean up.)

I note that I have never really had a performance problem with Firefox (be it with pure Firefox or the Tor Browser*) before this supposed performance enhancer, possibly because I use few plug-ins and have various forms of active content (including Flash and JavaScript) deactivated per default—as anyone with common sense should. This makes the feature the more dubious, because it has (for natural reasons) taken a very large bite out of the available developer resources—resources that could have been used for something more valuable, e.g. making it possible for plugins like “Classic Theme Restorer” to survive the upcoming XUL removal.

*Not counting the delays that are incurred through the use of Tor. I note that Tor is a component external to the Tor Browser, and that these delays are unrelated to the browser used.

Unfortunately, the supposedly helpful page “about:performance”, which was claimed to show information on tabs and what might be slowing the tabs down, proved entirely useless: The only two tabs for which information was ever displayed were “about:config” and “about:performance” it self…

Oh, and apparently Electrolysis is another plugin killer: The plugin makers have to put in an otherwise unnecessary effort in order to make their plugins compatible, or the plugins will grow useless. Not everyone is keen on doing this, and I wish to recall (from my research around the time of the first round of problems) that some plugins face sufficiently large obstacles that they will be discontinued… (Even the whole XUL thing aside.)

Now, it might well be that Electrolysis will prove to have a net benefit in the long term; however, we are obviously not there yet and it is obvious that the release(s) to a non-alpha/-beta tester setting has been premature.

Advertisements

Written by michaeleriksson

November 6, 2017 at 11:02 pm