Michael Eriksson's Blog

A Swede in Germany

Posts Tagged ‘recommendations

Blogroll update

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Last October, I added “eigentümlich frei” to my blogroll. Today, I am removing it again.

As I wrote in the linked-to text, I had concerns that “it appears to not be an entirely free-of-charge site”. Indeed, I have visited roughly once a week since then, and have typically lost half or more of the pages opened to a request for money—and typically those most interesting seeming. Today, I opened seven pages, of which all but one required payment. Paywalling can be legitimate and I do not object to the use of this business model;, however, for me to actively recommend paywalled contents, the value would have to be far greater. To this I note that the non-paywalled* contents is almost always re-published from other sources, which makes it fairer that the readers go to the original sources instead.

*The same might or might not apply to the paywalled. For obvious reasons, I cannot speak with authority on this point.

Other negatives include a comparatively slow stream of new content, an unfortunate start page, which makes it hard to get at new content fast, and comments limited to (paying) subscribers. Comments, however, are often a great help in understanding a text in a greater perspective, in seeing the pros-and-cons, and in gaining insight into the overall opinions on a topic. This the more so, the more dissenting the comment is, and even subscribers will be limited as readers, as the proportion of dissenters is likely to be far smaller among subscribers than overall. The restriction is also odd in light of an alleged pro-“free speech” stance.

As to the single non-paywalled page of this week’s reading attempts: It deals with worthy topics around “Wahrheit und Tabu” (“Truth and Taboo”), a recent suggestion to remove the word “Rasse” (“race”) from the German constitution, the Orwellian malpractice of trying to manipulate the people through language, whether this would be likely to succeed, whatnot. However, it does so with a very low information-to-noise ratio and mostly through rehashing what has been said many, many times by many, many others.* Those who already agree will gain little or nothing from reading it, those who might be convinced will likely not get even half-way through,** and those disagreeing on such issues will tend to be unmovable and likely to stop reading even earlier. As such, the value is extremely limited. To me, at least, this week’s visit was a pointless waste of time.

*Looking at the more abstract parts. The recent suggestion to change the constitution, e.g., is an understandably rarer topic.

**But I acknowledge that I should not throw the first stone as far as, at least, length is concerned.

Written by michaeleriksson

July 1, 2020 at 3:21 pm

Blogroll update

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Michelle Malkin is a relatively new contributor on UNZ.

Some of her writings have been sufficiently good that I had already contemplated adding her to my blogroll. In light of her recent ban from Twitter (as I mentioned earlier today), I will do so as an act of anti-censorship solidarity. This especially as UNZ, as a whole, has already been affected by similar recent attacks, as discussed in a recent text on misguided anti-“fake news” measures.

Her main page has been added to my temporary blogroll. It can be found under https://www.unz.com/author/michelle-malkin/.

Written by michaeleriksson

June 5, 2020 at 10:58 am

Blogroll update

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A significant contributor to alternate and uncensored viewpoints on e.g. world events is UNZ, a platform for free expression of opinion, and I originally intended to include it on my blogroll. Unfortunately, the quality of contents is too varying, and there are a number of both contributors and commenters moving more in the area of “conspiracy theory” than “alternate viewpoint” (even in a generous estimate), including large amounts of the-Jews-are-to-blame-for-X, and others clearly on the Left (or both). This is, obviously, perfectly in order for this type of platform (free speech must be free for everyone—not just those with the “correct” opinions), but it holds me back from an outright blogroll entry. This in part because such an entry could be misinterpreted, especially by a casual visitor, as an endorsement of opinions that I do not endorse; in part because it could prove a waste of the readers’ time.

I would, however, strongly recommend one* particular contributor: James Thompson, whose writings on intelligence and related topics was my accidental original** entry point. For those looking for the true*** scientific opinion on e.g. IQ tests, variation in cognitive abilities, etc., he is a very good source.

*Which is not to say that he is the only quality contributor, let alone that none of the others would be worthy reads to get a different point of view (cf. excursion).

**To some approximation: I have visited this site before, as it has occasionally popped up among search results, but until one visit, a few months ago, I had always just read the text found and then moved on.

***As opposed to what e.g. politicians, journalists, and, regrettably, many social scientists like to claim.

I had originally planned a longer discussion going into a bit more detail on a few of his texts, but my recent cut-down-on-blogging policy has changed that intention (aided by the time gone by, which would force an extensive re-reading). Among the links that I kept, however, a few honorable mentions without detail:

The Ethics of Taboo Genetics, which includes a discussion of the problems with PC intrusions on scientific work and debate.

The 7 Tribes of Intellect, which gives his characterization of the rough abilities of various intelligence groups.

Group IQ Doesn’t Exist, with the apt sub-heading “Smart groups are (simply) groups of smart people.”, well matching my own experiences and skepticism towards group work.

Excursion on guilt by association and related problems:
One reason for my not “blogrolling” UNZ whole-sale overlaps with the problem of guilt by association. Of course, here we have a further problem with censorship, intolerance of opinion, etc.: those with sane-but-unpopular opinions are often forced to seek out forums where they necessarily mix with debaters who have insane-but-unpopular opinions. As a consequence, they become vulnerable to guilt by association. (Of course, this can take more subtle shapes, often in combination with circular reasoning, e.g. that researchers x, y, and z are condemned as racist. How do we know that they are racists? They have received money from the racist Pioneer Fund. How do we now that the Pioneer Fund is racist? It gives money to racist researchers like x, y, and z…)

Excursion on the importance of alternate view-points:
I strongly believe that exposure to alternate view-points (and an open mind towards them) is vital to both intellectual growth and the development of a sound world-view. This includes those that we believe to be wrong. This is a recurring theme both with blogroll entries and in my own writings, as with e.g. [1], [2], [3].

Written by michaeleriksson

January 22, 2020 at 5:19 am

Blogroll update

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I recently stumbled over the German site https://ef-magazin.de/ or “eigentümlich frei”, and have read several entries that match my own opinions or provide perspective/information that would be valuable to large parts of the population on, at least, a “food for thought” basis.

These include:

A text on misinformation about nuclear power that distort the public opinion. Indeed, one of the greatest paradoxes in current politics, in my opinion, is how the German “Green” party is now reaping the political benefits of a climate crisis that has been severely worsened through the irrational hatred of nuclear power that this party (and many of its international peers) has. For thirty or forty years, this issue has been the likely single greatest item on the “Green” agenda, driving up the use of fossil fuels much further than would have been necessary.

A suggestion to rework the financing of public service TV in light of recent British suggestions. Indeed, for more than twenty years, I have viewed the variations of the “everyone must pay” systems used in both my adopted Germany and my native Sweden as grossly unethical, distortive to fair competition, and bringing very little value in light of the disputable quality of public service. This the more so after the Internet has made much of the original motivations redundant, e.g. through the great availability of free news.

Reporting on hateful Leftist students who grossly unethically and anti-democratically try to silence a lecturer with the “wrong” political opinions, in the same style so often reported from the U.S., e.g. by Minding the Campus. If in doubt, they are not only infringing on the lecturer’s right to freedom of speech and opinion, but also on the fundamental right of other students to form their own opinions—and not to just be force fed the official Leftist truth. This case is particularly perfidious: The victim is a professor* who attempted to hold a lecture on macroeconomics. The rejection stems from his being a member of the “wrong” party and seems unrelated to the actual lecture. In effect, his ability to perform in his profession is now being limited because of his political activity.

*“Hochschullehrer”: Literally, “university teacher”, which could conceivably imply something different than a professor, but I do not want to get bogged down with research and translations.

This site is put on the temporary blogroll. For the time being, I do not use the permanent for two reasons: Firstly, it appears to not be an entirely free-of-charge site. Secondly, the tone of writing is not always as neutral and factual as I would prefer. (In all fairness, it still does better than most Leftist sites and slips in tone usually have a far better reason than among the Left.)

Written by michaeleriksson

October 20, 2019 at 9:00 am

Blogroll update (much delayed)

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It has been a very, very long time since I updated my blogrolls—or even visited most of the linked-to pages.

To improve matters, I have just added three new links and removed a number of others. Note that the “temporary” section is reduced to one entry, due to the excessive time since the last update. (Normally, it would be fixed at three. Cf. my blogroll policy.)

Links that currently appear to be defunct are prefixed with a “#”. They might or might not work at some later time, from some different geographic area, or similar, but do not bet on it…

New:

  1. Minding the Campus deals extensively with problems on U.S. college campuses (and similar settings), notably in areas like freedom of speech and opinion, due process, and damaging PC excesses. Seeing that higher education is an enormously important topic and that the current course is disastrous, this site is one of the most important around.

    Recurring readers might recognize the name from repeated prior mentions.

    (English blogroll)

  2. Academic Rights Watch is a similar site with a focus on my native Sweden (in Swedish, despite the English name). Much of the same applies, but there are some thematic differences resulting from the different Swedish situation and/or different priorities in detail. (The former includes a more homogeneous population, a system that does not involve U.S.-style campuses, and a less intrusive-upon-the-students mentality of the colleges/universities.)

    (Swedish blogroll)

  3. educationrealist writes about practical experiences from teaching U.S. high-school students in a highly informative manner. I have a half-finished draft of a longer discussion that will be published in the near future.

    (Temporary blogroll)

Replaced:

  1. #My own old OpenDiary seems to be defunct. (Without my having been notified…)

    I have changed the link to point to a (complete or near complete) backup on my main web-site.

Removed:

  1. Foundation for Individual Rights in Education currently, in an unethical and visitor-hostile act, blocks access to content with a request that visitors join a mailing list. To boot, the usability of the web-site has otherwise been reduced considerably since the original addition; to boot, the interested reader will find much more information on Minding the Campus.

    (However, the foundation appears to still play an important part as freedom-of-speech and whatnot activists.)

  2. #Feminismus oder Gleichbehandlung leads to a browser-error page.
  3. #Call for a more sensible take on prostitution (German) leads to a server-error page.

    This site was also part of my temporary blogroll, and ripe for removal.

  4. #Länger Einkaufen in Bayern leads to a server-error page (and might have been hi-jacked by some type of squatter, porn site, or whatnot).

    This site was also part of my temporary blogroll, and ripe for removal.

  5. Human Stupidity was part of my temporary blogroll, and ripe for removal.

Written by michaeleriksson

January 5, 2019 at 12:19 am

Blogroll overhaul

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In the past year, I have had a blogroll divided into three short sections, “me”, “permanent”, and “temporary”—all deliberately kept short. In light of experiences to date, I am now overhauling this classification.

The “me” section will remain as is.

“Permanent” will be divided into sub-categories based on language. Of the four current entries, only Dilberte will remain. The other three (the WordPress tag listings in respectively, English, Swedish, and German) are removed: The Swedish and German tend to be too thin to warrant a recommendation; the English suffers from an idiotic layout problem, where the more interesting tags receive a different layout with severe usability problems. The word “permanent” will be dropped: With the greater number of entries, removals are foreseeable.

“Temporary” will remain, but limited to three entries (previously five): The idea to have a first-in-first-out queue of interesting blogs, noble causes, whatnot, was sound, but the rate of update was simply far too low for this to make sense in practice. Of the current entries, Christianity And The Witch Hunt Erae and Human Stupiditye are kept temporary (leaving one slot open for the time being). The remaining three are promoted to the permanent English blogroll (Foundation for Individual Rights in Educatione, durhamwonderlande, and The truth about domestic violencee).

(For historical information, including earlier discussions of the links kept and removed, search my blog for “blogroll” or the name of the link in question.)

The exact entries present on the “permanent” blogrolls will develop over time, but for a start I will include the following entries:

English:

The four entries already mentioned.

Swedish:

Genusnytte—Sweden’s leading source of criticism against feminism, disparate treatment of men and women, gender studies, and media distortions.
Aktivarume—a blog dealing with feminism and political correctness in Sweden.
Inteutanminasoner’s Bloge is re-added from the archives.

German:

Manndat: Feministische Mythene—A very thorough review and debunking of core feminist myths. Unfortunately, some of the material is only available through PDFs.
Feminismus oder Gleichbehandlunge—a somewhat satirical discussion of feminism in (particularly) Germany. Note that this page is part of what I suspect to be a site to recommend in general. Unfortunately, I have not yet had the time to dig in sufficiently deep to make a definite statement.
Alles Evolutione—A blog with interesting discussions of (mostly) evolutionary aspects of male and female behaviours.

As an aside, the content of these links in much reflect the development of this blog, which soon was taken over by discussions of feminism, political correctness, intellectual dishonesty, myths about this-and-that, … The reason is simple: Reading blogs (and often newspapers, political propaganda, and similar) there is an endless supply of ignorants who loudly proclaim something to be true that is not, who fail to use arguments and opt for personal attacks, who censor the arguments on others on a large scale, or otherwise try to distort the debate. A particular problem is the common attitude that there are opinions that would not merely be factually wrong, but actually morally evil and that these should be targeted with any means necessary—entirely missing the point that evil is demonstrated not by opinions, but by methods (including those listed above). These people (disproportionally represented among feminists and the politically correct, but also e.g. among creationists) are a major PITA for a me and, worse, as a group pose a considerable danger to the positive development of society, science, and the rights of the individual.</p

Written by michaeleriksson

May 28, 2011 at 9:37 pm

Blogroll update

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A few months ago, I encountered a twelve-part article series on the medieval witch hunts.e Being swamped with other things, I only read the first few parts at the time. Having now completed the reading, I would like to belatedly recommend it to others. Particular value is found in giving detailed information on the Catholic Church’s actual position on witches, who the typical perpetrators where, etc. Most of us have probably already learned in history class that the stereotypical image of a persecuting church is exaggerated and outdated (numbers of victims rivaling the Holocaust is certainly a fringe view), but the detailed treatment gives a noticeably deeper understanding. In other areas some more surprising pieces of information is found.

Obviously, reading about the witch hunts is also valuable with an eye on somewhat similar modern phenomena concerning e.g. child-porn or satanistic child abuse.

While recommending the series, I also raise a warning that the site (bibleapologetics.wordpress.come) is likely to be partial, which may or may not be reflected in some of the articles (e.g. when comparing Church and Science).

By the FIFO principle, Mansförtryck och kvinnovälde [pdf]e is removed. That entry was first discussed here.

Written by michaeleriksson

January 8, 2011 at 4:56 am

Blogroll update

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During my searches for the last entry, I found one very interesting post titled Rape Laws: dismantling of due process explained step by stepe.

Going through the rest of the blog, aptly named after its topics, Human Stupiditye, I have found a large number of other entries of value, including on e.g.:

Feminist hypocrisye and one-sided “equality”, which ties in well with with many of my own writings, including on Anna Ardin and Reversing the accusation.

PC abuse of languagee, specifically redefinition of rape. See also my entries on e.g. racism.

Critique of feminist anti-prostitution argumentse. This post also makes a point that I have speculated on for some time, namely that the true motivation for the anti-porn/-prostitution movement among feminists (or, possibly, women in general) is the building of a sex monopoly, where men are dependent on having and sucking-up to a girl-friend or wife. See also my article on Sex and power.

Pedophile witchhuntse. Also discussed by me on several occasions (at least [1], [2]).

By the FIFO principle, Ethics Alarmse is removed. That blog was first described here.

Written by michaeleriksson

December 12, 2010 at 7:55 am

Blogroll update

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Between my recent encounter with AfroCan et co. and a very interesting linke given by visitor WTPe, I have spent some time both writing and reading about issues relating to political correctness, with my reading heavy on the issues of academic freedom, free speech on US campuses, and similar. (See [1], [2], [3] for the writings.)

As a result, I am giving my temporary blogroll an overhaul with two additions:

  1. http://durhamwonderland.blogspot.com/e

    deals with the prolonged aftermaths of the false rape-accusations raised by Crystal Mangum against several members of Duke University’s Lacrosse team, including the condemnations and assumptions of guilt directed at the innocently accused by strongly PC faculty members and students—who seemed to be stuck on the idea of privileged, sexist, and racist white men raping and abusing an innocent black woman.

    At first, the topic of the Duke false-rape charges and the ensuing witch-hunt may seem to be a waste of space—years after the events. However, the blog manages to provide a wealth of interesting reading on related topics, including the lack of repenting and repetition of errors on behalf of Duke University, the highly destructive take that the PC crowd has on rapes, the lack of scientific-mindedness among the leftist (pseudo-)intellectuals on US colleges, and the new adventures of the “Group of 88” (88 faculty members at DU who presumed to declare the innocent guilty long before the matter reached the courtroom).

    This blog is particularly revealing to those who naively try to justify feminist ideas on e.g. “gender issues” by referencing academic research and authoritites—indeed, the absurd application of such ideas on the case at hand, aiming to justify the prosecution or saving the honor of the false accuser, Crystal Mangum, is another severe blow to their plausibility: Here cries of “Wolf!” are raised, where there definitely is no wolf present. (While many other applications occur in areas where the presence of a wolf is merely highly unlikely and unproved—not positively disproved.)

    As an aside, the attitude displayed by universities towards their students, both from the writings of durhamwonderland and what I have read and myself experienced elsewhere, is highly disturbing: They fail to realize that they are well-paid service providers with obligations towards the students—not feudal lords to whom the students have obligations. Indeed, outside of matters relating to academic success/failure and intrusive behaviour within the schools walls (in the same manner as a store may act against poorly behaved customers), the students’ behaviour and opinions are no business whatsoever of the school. If something is illegal, it is in the jurisdiction of the authorities (and should be left exclusively to them); if not, the school has no justifiable reason to interfere in the first place.

  2. http://www.thefire.org/e

    is the homepage of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, an organisation promoting freedom of speech and opinion on US campuses.

    Even taking the large number of universities in the US into consideration, the sheer number of violations of constitutional rights is surprising. Notably, if even students are exposed to restrictions of this kind, it is not surprising that outrages like the crucifixion of Larry Summers for engaging in legitimate scientific discourse (with claims that have great support in scientific results) or the Duke scandal take place. Nor is it surprising that universities increasingly lack critical thinkers on the faculty level.

    The range of problems is large, from a student being excluded from a class for using the F-worde outside (!) of class to forcing students to commit to PC ideologye.

Regrettably, both of these sites (the former more so) occasionally engages in undue rhetoric themselves: Too much rhetoric does not add, but diminishes, the persuasive power in the eyes of a rational reader—and adapting evil methods in order to fight evil is self-defeating. (The PC movement, the gender-feminists, the Spanish Inquisition, even the Nazis, did not actually set out to be evil, but honestly believed that they did were the good guys. Great vigilance is necessary for those with strong idealistic opinions, lest they fall into the same trap.)

The following entries are removed based on the FIFO principle:

  1. Tanja Bergkvist’s bloge first described here.

  2. me-vs-corporate-americae first described here.

The reader will note that I have not added the original link from WTP. This for two reasons: Firstly, the blog contains much content (e.g. art photos) that is simple not relevant for my purposes with this update—no matter how valuable they may be in another context. Secondly, I do not want to give others the impression that I take suggestions for my blogroll. (This could lead to spam.) Still, there is much interesting reading to be found there (including links to other sites), and I do recommend a visit.

Written by michaeleriksson

November 4, 2010 at 10:06 am

Blogroll update

with one comment

Last week, I was directed to a page wishing to prove that more than 1 % of all desktop users use Linuxe. Considering its approach of actually trying to get sufficiently many Linux users to announce themselves, this is a herculean task, which can benefit from a little help—like the inclusion in a few blogrolls.

I recommend any Linux user to drop by to increase the statistic.

(Note: An email address must be given. While the site looks legitimate overall, I recommend the precaution of using a disposable address.)

By the FIFO principle, The Thoughtful Animale is removed. That blog was first discussed here.

Written by michaeleriksson

October 12, 2010 at 12:15 pm